Idaho Man Banned from Yellowstone National Park for Attempting to Cook Chickens in Hot Spring

An Idaho man has been issued a two-year ban from Yellowstone National Park for attempting to roast chickens in a hot spring.

After being alerted to hikers in an off-limits thermal area of the park carrying cooking pots on Friday, Aug. 7, a park ranger found two whole chickens in a hot spring inside a burlap sack, according to East Idaho News.

The unidentified man from Idaho was cited along with two others in the group for walking in a thermal area, according to the outlet.

In Mammoth Hot Springs court on Sept. 10, the man pleaded guilty to the citation, East Idaho News reports. He was also charged for violating closures and use limits, and was forced to pay $600 per charge plus two years of unsupervised probation and the two-year ban from the park.

A spokesperson for Yellowstone National Park did not immediately respond to PEOPLE's request for comment.

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According to Yellowstone's website, the park's hot springs have "injured or killed more people in Yellowstone than any other natural feature." The park advises visitors to "stay on boardwalks and trails in thermal areas" and to "keep your children close and don’t let them run."

"Yellowstone’s scenic wonders are sure to take your breath away: Don’t let them take your life," reads the website's safety guidelines page. "From boiling hot springs to thousands of wild animals, some of the hazards in Yellowstone will be new to you. Protect yourself and the sights you plan to enjoy by following a few simple rules."

Additionally, Yellowstone says not to ever approach the wild animals and never feed wildlife: "Animals that become dependent on human food may become aggressive toward people and have to be killed. Keep all food, garbage, or other smelly items packed away when not in use."

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